Nostalgic Shooting and Martin Scorsese

Now that we have digital cameras producing amazing quality, people are often digitally converting them into polaroid style, old-film-look, toy camera, cross processed*.

Now that we have rich, deep blacks on television sets, people are shortening the dynamic range and effectively lightening the shadows.

These may be “fad” styles and techniques, but they are ubiquitous at the moment. It might be down to nostalgia and romantacising styles from different eras but it isn’t confined to teens on their iPhones.

In The Aviator, Martin Scorsese decided to shoot the film digitally then grade half of it to look like two-strip technicolor and the other half in three-strip. Despite my reservations of the saturation of the media with this stylistic choice, Scorsese gets away with it because a) it is a narrative-led choice and b) he has a vast knowledge of cinema and the colour processes used, when and by who. Most people can cover the how, but Scorsese can cover the why.

There were different processes around back then,” Scorsese says. “Each process was different, and therefore, each film was different. That period of filmmaking and film viewing was formative for me, in a very primal way, and those images remain imprinted in my mind.

Read more about Scorsese’s homage to early colour processes.

Also: read about colour and digital production during The Departed.

These might be a bit technical and another league from what some of us are shooting, but it serves as good inspiration in areas that may affect us and we can also apply some of the theory to our own decisions. These are Scorsese’s first two features he shot digitally and he speaks openly and honestly about the switch.

*I’d like to point out that I have been known to use these “fad” styles, from time to time..

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