David Fincher and The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo [Round-up]


I really enjoyed The Social Network and the original “Dragon-tattoo-trilogy” so I’ve been really looking forward to seeing it over the holidays. I’ve not managed to make it yet – tomorrow maybe, unless the new IMAX cinema is too tempting – but the online (and offline articles) have been really interesting and plentiful.

David Fincher, director

First off, we have a broad interview that discusses early Fincher, including Billy Idol music vids. Some nice honest opions in here.

Trent Reznor discusses getting into soundtracking movies and his work on TGWTDT

“I thought maybe I should call Hans Zimmer,” he says, referring to the German composer who scored Gladiator and The Dark Knight, “and see if I could hang out with him and make coffee for him for a while and take a crash course in how the fuck you score films. But instead, I sat with Fincher and said, ‘I’m not going to bullshit you. I don’t really know how to do this. What do you want?'”

Fincher Reframes in Post

Actually quite close to our last post about aspect ratios, I am going to write about reframing in post later on – so this article was right up my street.

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The RED ONE and The Cinematography of Winter’s Bones

If I was shooting a drama feature, a television pilot or really anything I could take my time over (soon enough), I would love to have a RED ONE. I was looking at the trailer for the upcoming film Source Code and found myself wondering what it was shot on. Turns out that they shot mainly on 35mm, with one segment using the RED – a technique that we are seeing a lot of now (this was also the case for Black Swan, albeit 16mm and Canon 5DMKiis and 7Ds). The director of Source Code, Duncan Jones, says in an interview that it was down to him seeing David Fincher’s test of Leonardo DiCaprio lit with a single match:

And Winter’s Bone: this is one that I kept hearing about but never managed to catch until the DVD release. Shot on a Red camera, with a partially inexperienced cast, this film is different and refreshing.

Here we have an interview with Michael McDonough, the cinematographer of Winter’s Bone, discussing the film.

The main benefits of the new large-sensor cameras, for me anyway, is the shallow depth of field, the ability to shoot amazing footage at low light levels and the price tag. That, along with the top-end systems available to consumers, levels the playing field and democratises filmmaking – but the content will always be king and hopefully it will result in a better range of entertainment.

UPDATE: More videos of remarkable things being done on RED cameras.